Full text: papers communicated to the first International Eugenics Congress held at the University of London, July 24th to 30th, 1912

Introduction. 
In issuing the invitations for this Congress, only the most 
general indication of the objects aimed at was given. 
Eugenics, as Sir Francis Galton termed the study of the 
agencies under social control that may improve or impair the 
racial qualities of future generations, presents, it was stated, 
problems of the utmost social importance. At present the most 
urgent need is for more knowledge, both of the facts of 
heredity and of the effects of social institutions in causing 
racial change. As knowledge accrues, it must be disseminated 
and translated into action. The imparting of such knowledge 
would constitute a great advance in education : for both 
private individuals and public bodies have yet to be impressed 
with the gravity of the situation, and induced to act on 
eugenic principles. Ultimately it may be possible to induce 
Society to adopt a well-considered eugenic policy and to 
carry out reforms on eugenic lines. To attain these ends, 
however, it is necessary that those who are alive to the 
dangers of the present social situation should combine to¬ 
gether for the purpose of exchanging views, and of discussing 
concerted schemes of action. This is the basis on which this 
meeting is about to assemble. 
Nothing, it will be observed, either in the foregoing 
statements, or in the method of nominating the readers of 
papers mentioned in the Preface, implies the adherence to 
any fixed eugenic creed on the part of those attending the 
Congress. Every reader and every speaker is solely 
responsible for his own utterances, and individuals and 
societies must not be held to be in the least degree com¬ 
promised by the expression in this volume of any views to 
which they dissent. 
B 2
        

Note to user

Dear user,

In response to current developments in the web technology used by the Goobi viewer, the software no longer supports your browser.

Please use one of the following browsers to display this page correctly.

Thank you.