Full text: papers communicated to the first International Eugenics Congress held at the University of London, July 24th to 30th, 1912

IOSection I.D. F. Weeks 
universal civilisation, should contemplate the preservation of its own ethnic 
type. Differentiation amongst peoples is an indispensable factor in human 
progress. The science of eugenics should not look for the realisation of a uniform 
type of man, but vary its aims and methods according to the natural 
differentiation of races and nations, taking account of ethnic psychology 
equally with ethnic somatology. 
The humanity of the future will be physically and mentally superior 
to the existing humanity, but the amelioration of the species ought not to aim 
at the equality of races and populations. These races and populations 
ought not to lose their acquisition of particular adaptations to different 
conditions of existence. 
A science of universal or common eugenics should allow a eugenic 
ethnology to exist, which should indicate and facilitate for each race or 
nation the defence and propagation of its own physical type and its own 
mentality. The most vigorous and dominant races will always be those 
which know how to create and preserve in sexual unions their characteristics 
of structure and culture. 
THE INHERITANCE OF EPILEPSY. 
(Abstract.) 
By David Fairchild Weeks, M.D., 
Medical Superintendent and Executive Officer, the New Jersey State 
Village for Epileptics at Skillman, U.S.A. 
In this paper the writer has endeavoured to learn what laws, if any, 
epilepsy follows in its return to successive generations, and the relation it 
bears to alcoholism, migraine, paralysis, and other symptoms of lack of 
neural strength. 
The data used in the study was analysed according to the Mendelian 
method which assumes that the inheritance of any character is not from 
the parents, grandparents, etc., but from the germ plasm out of which every 
fraternity and its parents and other relatives have arisen. If the soma 
possesses the trait of the recessive to normality sort, it lacks in its germ 
plasm the determiner upon which the normal development depends, and this 
condition is called nulliplex. If the soma possesses the trait of the 
dominent to normality sort, the determiner was derived from both parents 
and is double in the germ plasm, or normal, all of the germ cells have the 
determiner; or else it came from one parent only, is single in the germ
        

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