Full text: papers communicated to the first International Eugenics Congress held at the University of London, July 24th to 30th, 1912

t8Section II.L. Querton, 
as soon as possible to the masses of the people the individual conditions, 
fully understood, which alone permit a favourable and healthy procreation. 
In a word, it is necessary, by every means and as soon as possible, to 
organise a great movement in order to show to the greatest number of human 
beings the absolute necessity for a conscientious, i.e., an enlightened pro­ 
creation. We must bravely approach the civilising of the reproductive 
instinct, which alone has remained in a barbarous state amongst all the so- 
called civilised nations from the earliest times. 
Then only, when societies have fulfilled this duty, will they have the 
right to investigate what they ought and can effect against those for whom 
future offspring would be recognised as fatally disastrous. 
Finally, it is fully understood that researches relating to selection in 
the human species must be pursued in a parallel manner, as is now done 
with such fruitful results for animals and vegetables in Genetics, and in 
throwing light upon the constantly increasing conquests of this other science. 
PRACTICAL ORGANIZATION OF EUGENIC ACTION. 
(Abstract.) 
By Dr. Louis Querton, 
Professor at the University of Brussels. 
Now that many studies on the physiology and hygiene of reproduction 
of man have been made, and many investigations on degeneration have 
been conducted, we may face the problem of the betterment of the race, 
from a practical standpoint. 
If the eugenic action cannot yet strive directly against hereditary trans­ 
mission of anomalies, it can fight successfully against the causes of 
degeneration which act during the development of the individual. 
Physical and social environment influences these causes, which, on account 
of their growing complexity, create more and more obstacles to the normal 
evolution of the individual, while at the same time they force him to acquire 
greater and more varied aptitudes. 
To thwart the prejudicial action of the environment on the development 
of the individual, the systematic organization of this development seems 
to be of first importance.
        

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